Le Souffleur

 

Le Souffleur, not far from the Savannah Sugar Estate, is a must see if you like wild and rugged landscape.

It is a little out of the way on the south coast and might be a little tricky to find if you don’t know the area.

To get to Le Souffleur, you need to drive to l’Escalier village and reach the Savannah Sugar Estate. You then go past the estate, following the road to an area called Savinia.

 

Le Souffleur
On the way to ‘Le Souffleur’

 

On the way, you will see an old chimney and some beautiful old buildings/ruins.

 

Le Souffleur
Old Chimney

 

Le Souffleur
A beautiful big tree next to an old building ruins.

 

You should then see a big rock with ‘Le Souffleur’ written on it. Turn left and follow the dirt road.

 

The road to Le Souffleur
If you see this rock, you’re on the right track!

 

At first the road is quite large and easy to follow with beautiful palm trees on either side.

 

The road leading to Savinia
The road leading to Savinia

 

Then it becomes somewhat narrower and bordered on each side by rocky walls creating pasture areas for cows. The landscape around there have a feel of some English/Scottish countryside.

 

Le Souffleur
The road is then bordered by these low rocky walls.

 

From the rock mentioned above with ‘Le Souffleur’ written on it, you should drive approximately 20 more mins before you reach your destination.

On site, there are some parking space alongside the road. Buses and cars can also come closer to the cliff area, so you need to be careful with children as there is often quite a bit of motor vehicle movement and not always in the most orderly fashion!

 

Le Souffleur
The car movement is constant as visitors come and go throughout the day.

 

From there you can see the waves crashing on the cliffs offering a beautiful scenery of the splashing water. When the sea is rough the splashes can apparently go up to 15 to 20 m high.

 

Le Souffleur
The rough sea of the south coast.

 

The water also enters the side of a rocky formation and pushes through a hole creating a spurt of water like a whale’s blowhole, from where it’s name of ‘Le Souffleur’ comes from.

Should the waves not be high enough to see ‘Le Souffleur’ in action, you will at least see the beautiful scenery of drizzling water from the rocks when the waves withdraw.

 

Le Souffleur
Watching the water drizzling down from the rocks…

 

Le Souffleur
… while waiting for the ‘Souffleur’ to be in action.

 

If I remember correctly, when I was young, we used to be able to walk to the other side of the rocky formation through a very narrow pathway. However it seems that this is no longer possible as the connection is now completely eroded.

 

Le Souffleur
The link to the rock formation has eroded through the passing years.

 

I just love sitting there and watch the continuous movement of the sea crashing against the rocks and could stay hours if it wasn’t for the sea spray constantly filling the air and making it a little uncomfortable after a while.

 

Le Souffleur
The everlasting movement of the waves.

 

Le Souffleur
A scenery I don’t easily tire of.

 

If you have your camera or any other electronic equipment you should protect these from this constant salty humidity, as it is quite lethal to these.

 

Le Souffleur
Watching the crashing waves.

 

There is a path that can be followed on the left side when facing the sea. We have not done that walk yet which, if I’m not mistaken, leads to the ‘Pont Naturel’, another beautiful spot in the south.

 

Le Souffleur
There is a path that can be followed along the cliff.

 

You could spend a while and picnic around there I guess, although we usually don’t because of the constant car movement and lack of comfortable spots around. The volcanic rocks can somewhat be a little sharp on the edges!

 

Le Souffleur
The landscape at Le Souffleur is rugged and doesn’t offer many comfortable spots

 

Le Souffleur
… even if quite beautiful to the eye.

 

Nevertheless, it is a nice stop when visiting the south coast of the island.

 

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